Online Journalism

Entries Tagged as 'Facebook'

Facebook can make or break you

March 19th, 2011 · Comments Off on Facebook can make or break you

Some people love it. Some people say it’s the devil. But with over 500 million users, we cannot deny its power.

Facebook is the latest medium that can help decide if your interviewer will hire you.

We all have had someone put in a good word so that it can help us get a job. A more formal name for that is references.

Facebook is one of the leading websites that socially and professionally networks people so that they can apply for a job. It was designed to connect people to the jobs they want.

New jobs such as social media strategist, social media publicist and social media coordinator have opened up because of the Facebook Revolution.

Getting recommendations is one of the biggest boosts in obtaining a job. Whether you are in the automotive, marketing, fashion or construction industty, Facebook is the tool to market careers for all.

By networking through Facebook, it creates a much more personalized tone to showcase who you are. Posting pictures of you getting wasted with your tongue kissing a bottle of Jose Cuervo is not the wisest thing.

Facebook is not just about updating your statuses about what you are eating for breakfast. Writing about yourself in pursuit of a job to your friends…that can also help.

So, it’s time for you to get on Facebook, but this time for doing good and exhibiting your talents, not just stirring up drama.

Happy reading folks.

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Guest speaker: Jim Iovino

March 10th, 2011 · Comments Off on Guest speaker: Jim Iovino

With the world turning to the internet, NBC Washington takes their television content and puts it on their website.

The sooner you get stories out on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, etc. the more people will acknowledge you as a consistently good reporter. Thus, you will receive more traffic and gain attention. You want to be the first to say that you broke the story and knew about it before anyone else.

Important thought:

The good, basic journalistic reporting is the start to anything. You need to ask the best questions to get the best answers for a unique story.

Connecting with the audience is good to build a relationship with viewers and interact to gain attention. Pat Collins does a great job of this, taking 20 minutes out of every day to answer questions from his audience via the internet.

NBC Washington takes plenty of videos from people in the area to collaborate with them and share information. With videos, people love raw footage rather than someone anchoring the video segment.

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

My Video Conference with George Allen on C-SPAN

March 10th, 2011 · Comments Off on My Video Conference with George Allen on C-SPAN

George Allen is back and on top of his game! Allen participated in a C-SPAN video conference with students from George Mason University and The University of Denver to discuss his upcoming Senate run and his new book “What Washington Can Learn from the World of Sports.”

I was one of the lucky students who had the chance to personally talk to Allen and ask him a question, “You have mentioned numerous times that Thomas Jefferson is one of your biggest role models; what similarities do you see between yourself and him?”

He mentioned that besides the distinct title of holding Thomas Jefferson’s seat in the Virginia General Assembly, he admitted he is a self-described “Common Sense Jeffersonian Conservative.”

This formidable opponent opened up about his campaigns strategies to reach out to the community.

They are using:

Like I mentioned above, Allen’s book came out in 2010! One of the chapters in his book, which is relateable in his political life, sports life, and family life is: Defense Wins Championships.

Solid conclusion.

As related to online journalism, Allen ended with “The internet is the best invention since the Guttenberg Press”. I could not have out it any better, Mr. Allen.

View George Allen’s Announcement video on YouTube!

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

My Video Conference with George Allen on C-SPAN

March 10th, 2011 · Comments Off on My Video Conference with George Allen on C-SPAN

George Allen is back and on top of his game! Allen participated in a C-SPAN video conference with students from George Mason University and The University of Denver to discuss his upcoming Senate run and his new book “What Washington Can Learn from the World of Sports.”

I was one of the lucky students who had the chance to personally talk to Allen and ask him a question, “You have mentioned numerous times that Thomas Jefferson is one of your biggest role models; what similarities do you see between yourself and him?”

He mentioned that besides the distinct title of holding Thomas Jefferson’s seat in the Virginia General Assembly, he admitted he is a self-described “Common Sense Jeffersonian Conservative.”

This formidable opponent opened up about his campaigns strategies to reach out to the community.

They are using:

Like I mentioned above, Allen’s book came out in 2010! One of the chapters in his book, which is relateable in his political life, sports life, and family life is: Defense Wins Championships.

Solid conclusion.

As related to online journalism, Allen ended with “The internet is the best invention since the Guttenberg Press”. I could not have out it any better, Mr. Allen.

View George Allen’s Announcement video on YouTube!

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Mobile content is twice as difficult

March 10th, 2011 · Comments Off on Mobile content is twice as difficult

Jakob Nielsen brings about quite an interesting topic with the world turning to their mobile phones for nearly everything nowadays. Although this change is happening, people won’t be able to comprehend as much on their phone screens as they would on a computer.

The reasons are simple:

  • Slower downloads
  • No mouse for an easy selection
  • Small screens, especially when compared to a computer screen
  • Application UI’s lack consistency

It’s much harder to understand complicated information when you’re reading through a peephole.”

I love this quote. It’s so true!

After an analysis that Nielsen did of Facebook‘s privacy policy featuring text that only people with at least one year of university education would find easy to read, the results were obvious:

  • Desktop screen: 39.18% comprehension score
  • Mobile screen: 18.93% comprehension score

In order for a text to be considered easy to read, the score must be above 60%, so even the desktop screen comprehension was only 2/3 of the desired amount.

This brings up all-important questions:

What makes mobile reading harder?

Why is it approximately twice as hard to understand complicated content when reading on the smaller screen?

The smaller screen.

  1. Because users see less at any given time than they would on a computer screen.
  2. Because users must move around the page more, needing to scroll around different pages rather than seeing it all right in front of them on a normal computer screen.

That’s why mobile reading is more difficult.

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Soldier Transition Project

March 9th, 2011 · Comments Off on Soldier Transition Project

For my online journalism course with Professor Steve Klein, I am required to create a multimedia project with several other classmates. We are able to chose our topics and choose our teams, keeping in mind stories that work well over multiple media outlets and keeping in mind the need for multiple skill sets.

Several weeks in to the semester, one of my classmates gave a presentation about her project idea. She hoped to follow army soldiers as they transitioned from a life of war in Iraq and Afghanistan to a civilian life at George Mason University. If the project went as planned, she explained, it could potentially be featured on the ACAP, or Army Career and Alumni Program, website.

Intrigued by the idea, and excited about the potential benefits coming from the project, I decided to join Tony’s “Soldier Transition Project,” as we have now come to call it. My other teammates include Brandi, Jen, Ethan and Aisha.

Together, we hope to create a sleek website that involves multiple pages. One tab off of our main page, will include the actual stories that our team writers have worked on. This page will also likely involve slide shows of a particular soldier, and his or her actual interview. Another part of the website will include resources that future soldiers can use to help them transition in to college life.

My main part of the project will be the social media page. On this page I hope to integrate an RSS feed from ACAP and other soldier resources. I also hope to have a feed that will feature useful tweets for our audience. These tweets will likely involve the G.I. Bill. If I get approval from our subjects, I also hope to connect with them through Facebook and feature some of their statuses that will capture how emotional the war and the transition has been.

Over spring break I plan to gather up sources, and get information on our interviewees so I can see about my plans for Facebook. As the project goes on, I will update this post so you all can keep up with our progress up to the finished project!

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Facebook Journalism On The Rise

March 9th, 2011 · Comments Off on Facebook Journalism On The Rise

Facebook is not only a place to connect with friends, it is now more and more a way to connect with news. A recent post by Vadim Lavrusik on Mashable talks about this growing trend. Facebook journalism is on the rise because the social media site is becoming more public, Lavrusik says. The recent Egyptian revolution [...]

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

JournalismNext (11): Building a digital audience for news

March 9th, 2011 · Comments Off on JournalismNext (11): Building a digital audience for news

Track all that you publish

Productivity is a key factor for managers when tracking a reporters’ ability to break news,  publish at a good rate, and gain an audience.

What to track:

  • Total news stories per day
  • News stories by topic or section
  • Total blog posts per day
  • Blog posts by specific blog
  • Slide shows per week
  • Video stories per week
  • Podcasts or other audio stories
  • News updates
  • Breaking news e-mail alerts
  • SMS or other mobile news alerts
  • E-mail newsletters that are not sent automatically
  • Twitter, Facebook or other social network posts
  • User-generated content

A web-based spreadsheet is the best way to track all of these.

Track your audience

  • Use web analytics software

Wed analytics: The software and mechanisms to track web site traffic

Identify key data points

  • Pageviews
  • Visits and unique visitors compared
  • Engagement and referrers

Search engine optimization

  • Spiders and robots
  • Indexing
  • Queries

Use SEO to grow your audience

  • Content is king
  • Linking is queen

Make sure your links make sense

  • Title tags
  • HTML meta tags

Make good headlines better

  1. Keywords, keywords, keywords
  2. Use conversational language
  3. Don’t be afraid to inject a little attitude

Target specific social media distribution channels

  • Blogs
  • Flickr, YouTube, etc.
  • Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, etc.
  • Digg, reddit, Fark, StumbleUpon, etc.

Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Chapter 10: Managing News as a Conversation

March 8th, 2011 · Comments Off on Chapter 10: Managing News as a Conversation

“Now that news is a conversation, one of the greatest challenges facing journalists is how to manage, and leverage, that conversation.” – Mark Briggs

According to Briggs, journalism now means 1) managing online communities as well as 2) participating in various social networks.

Audiences being able to comment on stories online and voice their opinions is not only a way to stay technologically savvy, but it gives the journalist more to work with.

Yes, journalists have always had sources, but by making news into a conversation, journalists can have a lot more sources,” said Patrick Thornton, editor of BeatBlogging.org. “What would you rather have: a network of 25 sources or of 500? Being social with users is easier than ever before, and the more social a journalist is with people, the more sources a journalist can mine.”

Len Brody, who aided in the launch of NowPublic, says there are five different types of user generators based on people’s motivation for commenting. They are:

  1. Those motivated by money (smallest)
  2. Those motivated by ego
  3. Those motivated by issues
  4. Accidental bystanders who didn’t set out to do any reporting (largest)
  5. And the “plain old crazy” users that every Web site seems to have

The chapter then goes on by explain how to build and manage a community online. Here is a list of how to do that:

  • Make news participatory: interactivity by contributing photos, video, event listings, edits, message board posts, blog posts, votes and recommendations and promotions.
  • Journalists must get involved:evangelizing the brand, soliciting the content, moderating comments, solving user problems, running contests, etc.
  • Develop sources through social networks: finding sources through Facebook, MySpace, Linkedln, etc.
  • Collaborate with your community: collaborating with your competitors and fellow journalists to get the best information out there for your audience.

In conclusion, you want to follow these steps to keep conversations accurate and ethical:

  • Setting guidelines for participants
  • Monitoring offensive postings
  • Knowing your legal responsibilities
  • Correcting errors

Tags: briggs · Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts

Chapter 10: Managing News as a Conversation

March 7th, 2011 · Comments Off on Chapter 10: Managing News as a Conversation

Questions and challenges for the modern journalism:

Description: Social Networking Source: own wor...

Image via Wikipedia

  • How to maintain objectivity or credibility
  • Legal and ethical issues with publishing freedom for everyone
  • How to gather the audience

With social networking tools and blogs embedded on news sites, conversing the news is possible. One can converse through comments or social networking (Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.). This can enable tremendous ways to communicate and collaborate with the audience, despite potential problems due to anonymity. The benefits to news as a conversation include:

  • Transparency
  • Immediate feedback
  • Spread of news through word-of-mouth marketing

The 1-10-100 rule for participatory online communities:

  • 1 percent of the user community — including the journalists on news sites — actually create content
  • 10 percent of the user community will “synthesize” the content by posting a comment, e-mail, blog post or a link from a separate site.
  • 100 percent of the user community will benefit from actions of the first two groups.

Some of successful Web sites that utilizes user-generated communities are Wikipedia, Flickr and YouTube. User-generated communities do not cost money. However, it takes a great amount of time, energy and resources to build the sufficient community for the purpose. Major tasks for creating user-generated communities include:

  • Evangelizing the brand
  • Soliciting the content
  • Moderating comments, blogs and other user submissions
  • Solving user problems
  • Staffing booths at weekend events
  • Running contests to drive traffic

Some of ways to keep your user-generated communities clean and safe:

  • Don’t editorialize
  • Consider if public disclosure of someone close to you may become embarrassment to them.
  • Monitor offensive postings
  • Know your legal responsibilities
  • Correct errors
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Tags: Comm361 · Facebook · Student Blog Posts